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Reviews

Book Review

Wasp is a richly-textured descriptive novel which instantly engages the reader and plunges them into the underbelly of 18th century society. A world where "Harris's List of Covent Garden Ladies", a yellow-pages for the Georgian libertine, could sell 8,000 copies a year.

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Book Review

Since the huge success of The Old Ways in 2012, itself the eagerly anticipated final instalment in a "loose trilogy about landscape and the human heart", Robert Macfarlane has been feted as leading a renaissance in nature and travel writing.

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Book Review

A remarkable book looking at a community rocked by a homicide epidemic. Based on extensive research into the workings of the homicide units of the LAPD this report gives an eye-opening analysis of the streets, the homes and the lives of the LA community. It looks in particular at t

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Book Review

“Down with the dictatorship of aches and pains, and down with the doctors who stuff us with pills, and down with the daily routine that’s sending us to our graves. We’ve got to rebel. And when the end comes, well, we can bow out with dignity.”

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Book Review

Hamish Ellerby lives with his mum and older brother in Starkley, the UK’s fourth most boring town. Or is it? Soon things are about to get interested – and dangerous.

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Book Review

There is much to intrigue and engage the reader in Vanishing Girls. It is told from two points of view by sisters Dara and Nicole. It covers the time before a car accident and after which Nick seems to survive unscathed and Dara is less lucky.

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Book Review

Reading fictional tales of drunken and drugged-up excess is sort of like listening to a friend soliloquise about how last night (a night you were absent for) was the best night he’d had in his life, describing at length everything he ingested, from alcohol to ecstasy to bodily fluids.

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Book Review

When a mysterious shop made of sparkling black stone appears nestled among the original shops on a Glasgow street people are curious.

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Book Review

Tralane Huntingore, the central character, defines the Glorious Angels of the title as "bolts from the blue, forces of nature, that kick you sideways out of all your best laid plans". Uncertainty, surprise and the inexplicable do indeed form a large part of this intricately plotted, multi-fa

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Book Review

Pushkin Press has created a pretty unique book. Start at one end to read a collection of 15 short stories: Karate Chop. Flip the book over to begin from the other end and you start reading a strange but gripping short story: Minna Needs Rehearsal Space.

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