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Reviews

Book Review

A bestseller in Bert Wagendorp’s native Netherlands, Ventoux has recently been made into a film, and is now available in Paul Vincent’s English translation.

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Book Review

Isabel Ashdown’s fourth novel Flight is a brilliantly told and intriguingly posed narrative about friendship, relationships and family life. 

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Book Review

This is the story of two women who, for different reasons, feel a connection to Morocco. Nell is grieving for her mother who died suddenly in strange circumstances and Amy is a photographer who is determined to remain aloof and independent.

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Book Review

Alex Hourston has been tipped by the Observer as one of their "New Faces of Fiction 2015" for her debut novel In My House, an intriguing character study of a woman whose secrets won’t stay buried. 

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Book Review

In her two previous offerings, Pear-Shaped and Leftovers, Stella Newman announced herself as the go-to girl for fun, romantic contemporary women’s fiction with a helping of foodie delights, and in The Dish she does it again. 

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Book Review

The novel opens with 22-year-old Judith visiting her mother in prison and continues switching between Judith now and Judith the child of ten years ago as she tries to cope with her mother’s new relationship.

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Book Review

Originally published in 2008, John Green’s Paper Towns has been reissued ahead of its big-screen release in July.

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Book Review

Cruise ships can prove rich pickings for thriller writers with hundreds of people forcibly enclosed together in the wide-open sea. Throw in a power failure and a character who is not purely on the ship for a sun, sea and sangria holiday and you have a heady set up for horror.

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Book Review

Pushkin Press’s Mexico20 does for Mexican literature what Granta does for English literature: provides a selection of texts from young (under the age of 40) writers which pretty much constitutes a “ones to watch” style list.

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Book Review

Britain would not be as it is today without the Greeks of the 5th century BC - even though our democracy continues to show itself imperfect. However, as I. F. Stone shows, much of what we believe about the Ancient Greeks is myth and many of the actors were not heroic.

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Book Review

Christy and Joe Davenport cannot believe their luck when they buy a bargain house on Lime Park Road. Never mind the fact that they'll be living on baked beans for years in order to afford the mortgage; at last they feel they've arrived.

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