Sign up to our newsletter

Reviews

Book Review

The blurb and title of Saskia Sarginson’s third novel, The Other Me, somewhat belie the incredible depth and nuance of this impressive novel, giving little away about the historical and emotional contexts that underpin the story. 

More

Book Review

The Dead House is a very creepy novel, full of twists and turns that will keep you guessing beyond the last page.This is the literary equivalent of a "found footage" movie as the story is revealed through diaries, newspaper articles, police reports and transcripts of videos.

More

Book Review

Ian has managed to drag himself out of the mire of his unhappy childhood to become a successful author with a career, fame and money. When he meets Megan he also gains a fiancée and an even more promising future.

More

Book Review

“My name is Freedom and I killed my daughter.” Freedom Oliver is a loud mouthed alcoholic who is in the witness protection programme for killing her police officer husband, 18years previously.

More

Book Review

The debut novel from creative writing lecturer Maggie Mitchell is a model example of how to write a darn good literary thriller, packed with complex character perspectives, narrative twists and turns, intriguing human insights and a hefty spoonful of dramatic tension.  

More

Book Review

Set in the town of Helensburgh just before the Scottish referendum, the story begins with the murder of an apparently willing victim by two men who really have no stomach for the job.

More

Book Review

A perfect novel if you are curious to take a trip to the criminal underworld, the second in a proposed trilogy from Swedish author Alexander Soderberg.

More

Book Review

The Hand That Feeds You is based on an unusual premise compared to other crime novels; the idea that murder could be done by pet dogs is a novel concept, which adds a layer of unease, especially for dog-owning readers.

More

Book Review

Ciaran Devine was only 12-years-old when he was convicted of murdering his stepfather. Released back into the community after serving his minimum six years, he is unsure of his future.

More

Book Review

"Get rich. Get laid. Get even" shouts the tag-line on the cover of Michelle Miller’s The Underwriting, summing up neatly the desires in play in her novel.

More

Pages