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Reviews

Book Review

Samantha Harvey's third novel Dear Thief is notable for the bravery of its structure. The entire book consists of a letter, composed over six months (from Boxing Day 2001 to June 2002) to a woman whose whereabouts are unknown.

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Book Review
Author Lauren Oliver won acclaim for her books for young adults and children, but her novel Rooms unequivocally marks her first foray into adult fiction.

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Book Review
Andrew Marr, according to the publisher’s blurb, "has long wanted to write a political satire". One can understand why.

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Book Review
What with the worldwide popularity of Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn in 2013, publishers are quick to offer readers of women's psychological thrillers alternatives in the genre.

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Book Review
*contains spoilers for Eeny Meeny* Detective Inspector Helen Grace is struggling with normality after cracking what has become a career defining case, but the murderer was her own sister and her own colleagues almost became victims themselves. 

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Book Review
Damage is classic Dick Francis; dynamic and daring; crisply written but with a riveting story storyline.

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Book Review
It is the last day at school for teacher Yuko Moriguchi, but her farewell speech has a threatening tone.

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Book Review
“I know who killed him.” A simple premise, yet in the hands of acclaimed Irish crime writer Tana French it becomes a powerful, gripping and page turning novel with a plot filled with lies, secrets and a year old murder.  When Holly Mack

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Book Review
It is the middle of the night and snowing heavily but across a high railway bridge heading towards Stockholm is a young man. He is suffering from hypothermia and legionella but he still staggers through the snow.

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Book Review
The Girl Who Couldn’t Read begins slowly with a tortuously unpleasant description of the medieval practices at an asylum for the mentally ill while Dr John Shepherd, newly appointed assistant to the owner, is being shown around.

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Book Review
The Girl Who Couldn’t Read begins slowly with a tortuously unpleasant description of the medieval practices at an asylum for the mentally ill while Dr John Shepherd, newly appointed assistant to the owner, is being shown around.

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Book Review
A gripping novel set in contemporary Norway, See You Tomorrow is a true original. The action takes place over three days in September, starting on Tuesday evening when Pal takes his dog for a walk in the woods.

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