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Reviews

Book Review

Try to imagine 1.2 billion people. That is, give or take, the population of India today. And now imagine what all those people are doing right now, the myriad stories that are playing out as we speak.

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Book Review

There are 20 stories in Pond, ranging in length from a few lines to around 20 pages each; the pieces are loosely connected and are more akin to journal articles or poems than short stories. In general the longer sections are immersive and pull you deep into the psyche of t

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Book Review

On his weekly trip into town, 57-year-old Ray sees an advert in a shop window: a home is wanted for a bedraggled, one-eyed dog. He drives to the kennels and leaves with One Eye.

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Book Review

When 9-year old Rose is diagnosed with a life-threatening and life-restricting illness, her mother struggles to get her to concede to the daily injections and fears she is losing her daughter.

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Book Review

"Do you know how that feels to be let down by the two people you trusted more than anything in the world?" Six hundred and seventeen words is all it takes to bring 15-year-old Tess Turner’s world crashing down, to destroy everything she believed and ruin her neat family unit.

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Book Review

Donal Ryan, Irish author of the novels The Spinning Heart (winner of the Guardian First Book Award in 2013) and The Thing About December, returns with 20 jolting, voice-driven short stories suffused with loneliness and anger.

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Book Review

The first question one might ask of this collection – and one that the author is conscious of – is why do these myths need to be told again? Spurling’s book is just one in a long line of Hellenic Myth compendia.

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Book Review

Russian literary judges must have very high standards. The Women of Lazarus was shortlisted for three prizes and didn’t win any. It has everything a reader would ask of a novel: breadth, depth, psychological insight, acute observation, humour, tragedy, poetry and love.

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Book Review

Spanning the period from 1855 to 1919, Umi Sinha’s debut novel Belonging is pitched as a historical novel confronting Britain’s colonial past, the British Raj and the First World War, but whereas some novels can get bogged down in the historical detail and plod along, this is far from th

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