Sign up to our newsletter

Reviews

Book Review

Prize-winning Aboulela’s fourth novel moves between present day Scotland and 19th century Caucasus. The two halves centre round Natasha, a history lecturer specialising in the Caucasus and Shamil, the Muslim leader of the opposition to the Russian invasion.

More

Book Review

This is an eerie ghost story-come-descent into madness which picks at the scars of family relationships. John is one of three Hyde brothers. They are close but as with all families three is a crowd and alliances shift pairing different siblings at different times.

More

Book Review

Carla's used to being the new kid at school. Constantly moving from one school to the next wherever her mum's work takes them, she's never really bothered with making friends and putting down roots. But this time’s different.

More

Book Review

Pillow Man is the second book and first novel from London-based author Nick Coleman, whose debut non-fiction title The Train in the Night was shortlisted for the 2012 Wellcome Book Prize.

More

Book Review

For the first time Haruki Murakami’s first two novels, Wind and Pinball, have been translated into English. Published as a reverside hardback, the novel to be read first is Wind.

More

Book Review

The Dead House is a very creepy novel, full of twists and turns that will keep you guessing beyond the last page.This is the literary equivalent of a "found footage" movie as the story is revealed through diaries, newspaper articles, police reports and transcripts of videos.

More

Book Review

The title of this collection of short stories is a little misleading. Though the title derives from one of the featured stories, it seems to suggest that each story will look at how mankind interacts with the natural world.

More

Book Review

“There is something of a difference between being smart and being a smart arse.” Unfortunately, 15-year-old Nick hasn’t quite worked that out.

More

Pages