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Reviews

Book Review
It is difficult to tell you just how good this book is. No review could do it justice, only the book itself. An old woman remembers. It sounds straightforward but the writing is so beautifully controlled it makes you wonder at the possibility.

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Book Review

Someone is watching Wang Jun, leaving letters in his taxi, claiming to be his soulmate. This person insists that they and Wang have known each other for a thousand years, and has stories to tell of their various incarnations throughout Chinese history, from the Tang Dynasty to Mao’s regime.

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Book Review

Elizabeth is Missing by Emma Healey is written from the perspective of Maud, an old woman suffering from dementia, who despite struggling to remember her own daughter some days, is convinced her best friend, Elizabeth, is missing.

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Book Review
When Gabriel Askew returns to the village in which he grew up he acquires an allotment and hopes to spend his days peacefully. He lacks a gift for friendship and has spent his adult life trying to live inconspicuously.

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Book Review

Although written 20 years before his first published novel, Saramago's new book is a mature work written with his usual wisdom and sympathy. The publisher is not cashing in on juvenilia after an author's death: the book is an opening to his later novels.

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Book Review
The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton tells the story of Nella, who at 18 is married to the older, wealthy Amsterdam merchant Johannes Brandt. She arrives to find Johanne's pious and judgmental sister Marin, and two servants, protecting secrets they won't share with Nella.

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Book Review
In place of a blurb on the back of the book, Happy are the Happy by Yasmina Reza (and beautifully translated by Sarah Ardizzone) has 18 names linked with arrows.

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Book Review
Kashmir is at the heart of Brit Writers award winner, Shama Naqushbandi’s, first book. Although born and brought up in the England, Liyana’s soul home is 'the valley".

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Book Review
“Remember me, I will remember you.” So goes the Quranic verse that reverberates in Roopa Farooki’s latest novel, The Good Children, and encapsulates the novel’s exploration of family ties, the weight of the past and memory. Beginning in 1930s Lahore, with the

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Book Review

For sixteen-year old Skid, moving from the Louisiana swamp where he grew up to the big city is proving difficult. When unpacking boxes after the move, Skid finds a diary that belonged to his older brother Frico containing various family secrets and the revelation that his name is a hoodoo word.

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