Reviews

Book Review
The classic 1930s witty novel about one-upmanship has been released with a stunning new cover in time for the soon to be broadcast BBC adaptation.

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Book Review

Russian immigrant Slava Gelman works at a fictitious equivalent of the New Yorker, but his is a lowly position, writing “flubs” for the humour section of the magazine.

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Book Review
After a family tragedy, a grieving mother fervently throws herself into religion and is soon rewarded with a revelation that her son has a "vocation" as a priest.

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Book Review
Nominated for the Guardian first book award, in receipt of a $1 million advance in the US and inspiring comparisons with Jonathan Franzen, Matthew Thomas’s debut We Are Not Ourselves has already reaped substantial praise.

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Book Review
Set on the Suffolk coast at the outbreak of the First World War, this novel is told through the eyes of Thomas Maggs the son of the local publican, a loner set apart by his disability, dreaming of the sea.

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Book Review
Kate Horsley’s debut novel, The Monster’s Wife, is set as a sequel to the well-loved gothic classic Frankenstein. Oona is a feisty young woman on the verge of losing her best friend, May, to the world of marriage but currently she has lost her to her

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Book Review
Stefanie de Velasco’s first novel is a tale of two girls caught between adolescence and adulthood. Nini and Jameelah are two 14-year-olds living in Berlin.

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Book Review
The title of McEwan’s latest novel refers to the piece of legislation that outlines the duty of care towards a minor that the courts must exhibit.

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Book Review
Fans have delighted in Jane Austen’s work for centuries and surely the only complaint can be that we never got more of it, with just six completed novels and a handful of other works.

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Book Review
A quiet lament to a lost way of life haunts What Ends, Ladd’s debut novel chronicling the slow but inevitable decline of a small community living on the fictional Hebridean island Eilean Fìor.

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Book Review
It has long been obvious that Martin Amis is almost fatally attracted to the more questionable elements of society: from Money to London Fields to the more-recent Lionel Asbo, Amis’s novels are peppered with debased, degradation-drenched characters, dredged from the m

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