Reviews

Book Review
Australian academic and critic Peter Conrad has turned his attention to the American ideal in his first piece of popular non-fiction since Creation in 2007.

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Book Review
A self-help guide for women offering practical advice on finding your inner voice, moulding your vision and making things happen. The book identifies that many women are being held back…by themselves.

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Book Review
Did you know that the BBC's first director general John Reith didn't know at his interview what broadcasting was? Or that running over the end of a programme is called "crashing the pips"?

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Book Review
The Dress is divided into 100 themes such as the little black dress and the empire line.

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Book Review
The task of bringing one of history’s undeservedly neglected queens to life would be a daunting challenge for any historian, and yet it is one that Sara Cockerill, a barrister by trade, has managed splendidly.

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Book Review
In 2007 Russell Edwards bought a silk shawl which had allegedly belonged to Catherine Eddowes, a victim of the Victorian serial killer Jack the Ripper.

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Book Review
In In Real Life host of MTV’s "Catfish" Nev Schulman examines how we conduct ourselves online; how we live and love in the age of social media.

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Book Review
Brush up your Shakespeare with this, the fourth ''for grown-ups'' book by Foley and Coates.  It is subtitled "Everything You Need to Know About the Bard" and, by-and-large, lives up to its promise. The pace is brisk as there are only 300 pages, but this is a surprisingly weighty text.

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Book Review
There is a glut in the travel book market both of authors who deliberately manufacture an unlikely travel scenario in order write a book about it, and expats who have set themselves up, quite nicely thank you, abroad and wish to point out the differences between themselves and funny French men.

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Book Review
Duncan Barret’s book follows the fortunes of the men of the Post Office Rifles. Originally formed at the end of the 19th Century to protect Post Office buildings from Irish Act of Terror they later became part of the Territorial Army and were mobilised at the onset of the First World War.

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