Sign up to our newsletter

Reviews

Book Review
This book is, at its simplest, a compilation of survey responses that were given to a wide demographic of women across the world on the subject of clothes.

More

Book Review
Bryony Hill’s How I Long to be With You brings together a remarkable collection of letters, telegraphs and photographs from the two sides of her family during the Second World War.

More

Book Review
Merchant Adventurers is historian James Evans’ first foray into popular non-fiction. His subject is a sea voyage made from Tudor England in search of a north-east passage through the arctic.

More

Book Review
Anyone looking for that quirky gift or unusual literary present this Christmas may find it in the brilliantly fastidious The Book of 365.  Taking the numbers 1 through 366 (despite the title), the authors present 366 mini-essays that explore a particular

More

Book Review

The internet is an integral part of any highly developed economy; seemingly everything is connected to the network, from banks and businesses to power stations and military drones.

More

Book Review
Australian academic and critic Peter Conrad has turned his attention to the American ideal in his first piece of popular non-fiction since Creation in 2007.

More

Book Review
A self-help guide for women offering practical advice on finding your inner voice, moulding your vision and making things happen. The book identifies that many women are being held back…by themselves.

More

Book Review
Did you know that the BBC's first director general John Reith didn't know at his interview what broadcasting was? Or that running over the end of a programme is called "crashing the pips"?

More

Book Review
The Dress is divided into 100 themes such as the little black dress and the empire line.

More

Book Review
The task of bringing one of history’s undeservedly neglected queens to life would be a daunting challenge for any historian, and yet it is one that Sara Cockerill, a barrister by trade, has managed splendidly.

More

Book Review
In 2007 Russell Edwards bought a silk shawl which had allegedly belonged to Catherine Eddowes, a victim of the Victorian serial killer Jack the Ripper.

More

Pages