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Reviews

Book Review
In 2011 Ann Morgan looked up at her bookshelves and, after toting up the number of UK and US authors whose books she owned, came to a terrible conclusion: “I was a literary xenophobe.” Thus began a year-long project of “reading the world” - finding something to read from every single country on

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Book Review
I was so, so thrilled when I first glimpsed the bacon-adorned cover of Man Food. Despite the gendered title raising my feminist hackles, I was quite able to forgive Billy Law once I’d checked out his recipes.

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Book Review
I am not usually a cocktail drinker and stick to red wine and not much of it (except if it's free), but every time I go out for an after-work tipple I am greeted by the cocktail menu.

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Book Review
This book is, at its simplest, a compilation of survey responses that were given to a wide demographic of women across the world on the subject of clothes.

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Book Review
Bryony Hill’s How I Long to be With You brings together a remarkable collection of letters, telegraphs and photographs from the two sides of her family during the Second World War.

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Book Review
Merchant Adventurers is historian James Evans’ first foray into popular non-fiction. His subject is a sea voyage made from Tudor England in search of a north-east passage through the arctic.

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Book Review
Anyone looking for that quirky gift or unusual literary present this Christmas may find it in the brilliantly fastidious The Book of 365.  Taking the numbers 1 through 366 (despite the title), the authors present 366 mini-essays that explore a particular

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Book Review

The internet is an integral part of any highly developed economy; seemingly everything is connected to the network, from banks and businesses to power stations and military drones.

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Book Review
Australian academic and critic Peter Conrad has turned his attention to the American ideal in his first piece of popular non-fiction since Creation in 2007.

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Book Review
A self-help guide for women offering practical advice on finding your inner voice, moulding your vision and making things happen. The book identifies that many women are being held back…by themselves.

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Book Review
Did you know that the BBC's first director general John Reith didn't know at his interview what broadcasting was? Or that running over the end of a programme is called "crashing the pips"?

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