Reviews

Book Review
Brush up your Shakespeare with this, the fourth ''for grown-ups'' book by Foley and Coates.  It is subtitled "Everything You Need to Know About the Bard" and, by-and-large, lives up to its promise. The pace is brisk as there are only 300 pages, but this is a surprisingly weighty text.

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Book Review
There is a glut in the travel book market both of authors who deliberately manufacture an unlikely travel scenario in order write a book about it, and expats who have set themselves up, quite nicely thank you, abroad and wish to point out the differences between themselves and funny French men.

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Book Review
Duncan Barret’s book follows the fortunes of the men of the Post Office Rifles. Originally formed at the end of the 19th Century to protect Post Office buildings from Irish Act of Terror they later became part of the Territorial Army and were mobilised at the onset of the First World War.

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Book Review
The occupation of Paris by German forces in 1940, following the so-called "phoney war" period of the Second World War, is a dark, sinister and hotly-debated period in the French capital's history.

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Book Review
H is for Hawk is a story of grief at a father’s death, of a life regained, and, yes, of a goshawk. When Helen Macdonald’s father dies, she returns to a childhood obsession and starts to train a hawk she buys for £800 on a Scottish quayside.

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Book Review
Sam Kean’s third popular science book, The Tale of the Duelling Neurosurgeons, tells fascinating stories about how the brain works. “Tiny flaws in the brain [have] strange but telling consequences all the time,” Kean writes.

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Book Review

The blurb paints this book as a drug soaked trip around South America, of getting into dangerous situations whilst being “coked up to the eyeballs.” And while you don’t exactly need a sniffer dog to find the narcotics between the pages, this advertising really misses the point of Mark Mann’s jour

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Book Review

If you fancy a down-to-earth experience of man versus the elements, look no further than Naked and Marooned by Ed Stafford.

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Book Review

Barry Forshaw must have one of the best jobs around - unless you hate popcorn. He spends most of his time watching films or reading.

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Book Review

Charlie Carroll’s fascinating account of his recent trip to "the roof of the world" is no ordinary travelogue but also an extremely detailed version of the history of Tibet and its relationship with China.

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