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Reviews

Book Review

In an increasingly secular country religion is side-lined more and more, with those who process a faith often seen as relics from a bygone age.

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Book Review

Birds and People is a labour of love. Probably best described as a birdwatcher’s dream, this 600-page work swoops across the world of birds in unrelenting detail, giving not only the facts, but a compendium of culture, history and folklore.

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Book Review

The web is increasingly embedded into every area of people’s lives. Whether someone wants to be entertained, contact friends, do some work, find a new partner, or start a revolution, the web is generally considered the place to start.

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Book Review

1913 - the year before the start of the Great War, although of course no-one knew that at the time.

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Book Review

Sture Bergwall was Sweden’s worst serial killer. At 19 years old a forensic psychologist had labeled him a sadistic pedophile after an attack on a nine-year old boy, and Bergwall had been calling the forensic psychiatric clinic at Säter home since 1991.

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Book Review

As autism is a condition associated with a lack of communication and interpersonal skills, the thoughts and behaviour of those on the autism spectrum will often seem impenetrable to their family and friends.

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Book Review

Torre DeRoche isn’t unfamiliar with risk. It was a big risk to take off from her home country of Australia and move to America, where she knew no one. It was a risk to move in with complete strangers while she found her feet.

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Book Review

Suzanne Harrington's The Liberty Tree was written for her children. Those two children no longer have a living father, but by writing this book she has made sure that they will always know him - and her.

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Book Review

In this latest volume of memoirs from the bestselling author of Keeping Mum and Clever Girl, A Corner of Paradise is funny, sad, and very moving.

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Book Review

While not a UK household name like many of the celebrity chefs who constantly fill our television schedules, Marcus Samuelsson’s autobiography, Yes, Chef, should certainly help to rectify that.

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