The Gap Yah Plannah

The Gap Yah Plannah
Orlando
Reviewed by Nick O'Kelly
Fourth Estate
Thu, 29/09/2011
9780007432066
£12.99

Following on from the Youtube hit that immediately went viral comes Orlando’s literary debut, The Gap Yah Plannah.

Narrated by the crass philistine Orlando, a creation of Oxford graduate Matt Lacey, The Gap Yah Plannah skips from country to country through ‘chunderous’ anecdotes and ‘banterous’ snippets of advice for the fellow gap yah travellah.

Complete with pictures and sketches, the plannah is an addictive read, fast-paced and never once without humour, or banter, as Orlando would prefer it. It does away with pretences of spirituality and culture, although greatly encourages potential travellers to boast about such things, and instead meditates not on the meaning of life but on the ‘cash-lash ratio’ of the developing world (where less cash for more lash, or alcohol, is desirable). Orlando details his travels through a web of hilarious phrases and words that are guaranteed to make you ROFL. Referring to himself as the 'Archbishop of Banterbury', to Australia as 'Land Down Chunder' and to hangovers as being in 'Alice in Chunderland', the humour is unremitting.

Through Orlando, Lacey has punctured the heart of the culture of the undeserved privileged and made it farcical. An incidental critique of the upper echelons of society as much as a piece of entertainment, The Gap Yah Plannah uses as its source of humour the kind of person we all at least know one of. If you have found yourself gritting your teeth at the ‘spiritual’ Facebook status, the iPad slideshows or the repeated declarations of having ‘found’ oneself, then this book will give you the satisfying relief of knowing that you’re not alone, and permit you to LOL at the Gap Yah.

Humour

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