Harry Potter: Page to Screen

Harry Potter: Page to Screen
Bob McCabe
Reviewed by Stacey Bartlett
Titan
Tue, 25/10/2011
9780857687753
£49.99

It's the end of an era for Harry Potter fans, with Radcliffe and co. having hung up their wands and the book series already gathering dust.

But fans who aren’t quite ready to wave off the wizarding world just yet will devour Harry Potter: Page to Screen, which gives the ten-year film franchise a worthy send off. A massive book that wouldn’t look out of place in a Dark Arts class, Page to Screen beautifully and luxuriously tells the story of the filming process, from Philosopher’s Stone to Deathly Hallows Part 2.  
 
Priceless anecdotes are shared by the crew and cast members; Daniel Radcliffe was only cast two months before filming was due to begin when he was spotted in a London theatre by the casting director, and as a child was “completely unbothered” by the books before being cast aged 10. Somewhat horrifyingly, the first film was going to be the first three books combined, until producers saw sense and realized they would be taking on the Impossible Task, and outraging countless fans in the process.
 
Secrets from behind the camera are also shared – for example, to capture the magic of the philosopher’s stone and prevent it from looking like a plastic sweet, close-ups of the stone were filmed through flames to give a transient effect. And in the early days, little Daniel and little Rupert got the giggles so frequently while filming, director Christopher Columbus often had to step in and play the other one off camera to sober the situation.
 
Page to Screen keeps the magic of Harry Potter alive for just a bit longer and is a delight to dip in and out of. Separated into films and characters, it offers an untapped insight into the secrets of filming a multi-million pound blockbuster series, and will keep fans ticking over until Leavesden Studios opens to the public next spring.
 

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