Nine Uses for an Ex-Boyfriend

Nine Uses for an Ex-Boyfriend
Sarra Manning
Reviewed by Chloe Spooner
Headline
Thu, 02/02/2012
9780755355839
£14.99

Does true love forgive and forget? Or does it get mad... and get even?

There will be a lot of women out there who will be able to relate to Hope and her story, and I think that's what I liked most about it, that it's realistic and was just a really good read.
 
Hope is in love with boyfriend Jack, after quite a few years together. They have a little house, and seem to be happy enough pottering along with their day to day lives. But Hope's reality is shattered when she catches Jack kissing her best friend in the whole world, Susie. Hope wonders how much more betrayal Jack has done to her, and struggles to get over the cheating, but knows in her heart she still loves Jack and is torn between wanting him back and kicking him to the kerb for good. 
 
I really liked was how Hope's job as a primary school teacher wasn't just something she did, it was woven throughout the book, and many of the scenes involving the school and kids were important in shaping her as a character. As someone who works in a school, I thought these scenes were really believable and they definitely added something a bit different.
 
I would definitely recommend Nine Uses For An Ex-Boyfriend to anyone who enjoys a really well written story that will keep you guessing to the last page. Hope is a flawed but brilliant character who is struggling with the demise of the only relationship she's ever been in, and as such you can't help but love her for it, and how she struggles to deal with the big decisions she has to make. Manning's writing is very easy and enjoyable to read, and think she has crafted a brilliant story that will leave you wanting more.

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