Content tagged with Review

Book Review

Babbit lives with the Big One
and the Little One. When the Little One is not watching,
Babbit gets ‘grabbed' by the Witchy One and her mean
friends. Just in the nick of time the Big One and the Little One come to Babbit's rescue.

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Book Review

Julie Myerson's eighth novel, Then, marks her return to the disturbing themes that characterised her earlier works of dark fiction, this time in the previously unexplored dystopian setting of a post-apocalyptic London.

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Book Review

In Higashino's first book to be translated into English, we quickly learn who the murderer is, but that's inconsequential to the plot, which concerns whether Yasuko and her neighbour Ishigami, a mathematician, can get away with it.

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Book Review

This atmospheric novel tells the story of Jeanne, a young French exile orphaned by the Wars of Religion on the continent and brought to London disguised as a boy.

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Book Review

George Pelecanos' The Cut introduces Spero Lucas, a veteran of the Iraq war, who acts as an unlicensed investigator and all-around finder of lost things. When he is hired by a jailed drugs baron, Lucas finds his streetwise knowledge and fighting abilities are put to a rigorous test.

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Book Review

One of those rare books that stays with you well after turning the last page, Vanessa Diffenbaugh's début novel is a beautiful and haunting tale of discovering love in the most unlikely of circumstances.

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Book Review

This is the novel Dame Beryl Bainbridge was writing when she died in July 2010. I wonder how happy the author would have been with this version, assembled from her manuscript by friend and editor Brendan King. Although "happy" is perhaps not a word Bainbridge cared for in any case.

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Book Review

Meet Queenie Dove, a vivacious, self-proclaimed genius. Thieving her way around the streets of London during the Depression, Queenie seems to live a glamorous lifestyle but you begin to learn that heartbreak, despair and sadness are what really fill her life.

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Book Review

It's Dublin, the 1950s, the sun is shining and love is in the air. Well, sort of. The thing is, despite the engrossing, atmospheric prose and the crisp, purposeful dialogue, Benjamin Black's mysteries are pretty cloudy affairs.

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Book Review

Pauline and Gemma go to the same school. Pauline is neglected, tough and, consequently, a bully. Gemma apparently has a stable family, but reluctantly goes to live with her mother and her mother's boyfriend, whose main attraction seems to be his wealth.

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