Books published by Doubleday

Book Review
This debut psychological thriller is deliciously dark - Before I go to Sleep meets Gone Girl. The Girl on the Train follows the life of Rachel, an alcoholic embittered by her lot in life and desperate for escapism.

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Book Review
“I was still that wandering sheep, forever drawing closer to the fold, forever wandering back out into the wilderness.” Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë are among the great names of literary history and have garnered much attention and interest.

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Book Review

Crooked Heart is a heartwarming and engaging wartime novel that never descends into sentimentality or cliche. 

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Book Review
In 2012 Rachel Joyce introduced us to a retired gentleman called Harold Fry. He went on to steal the hearts of millions of readers as he walked across England to visit his ex-colleague Queenie Hennessy in a hospice.

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Book Review
After a family tragedy, a grieving mother fervently throws herself into religion and is soon rewarded with a revelation that her son has a "vocation" as a priest.

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Book Review
The promise of unexpected romance and lifelong friendship among the searing heat of 18th Century Spain will draw any lover of lively historical fiction to Ildefonso Falcones' dramatic new novel. Part-reality, part-Hollywood swashbuckle, The Barefoot Queen fol

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Book Review
Having already built a solid reputation in children’s literature, Linda Newbery’s first adult offering has the kind of slow-burning secrets that only the mature can endure. Anna has grown up not knowing what happened to her sister since the day she disappeared, at qua

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Book Review
Sam Kean’s third popular science book, The Tale of the Duelling Neurosurgeons, tells fascinating stories about how the brain works. “Tiny flaws in the brain [have] strange but telling consequences all the time,” Kean writes.

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Book Review

Someone is watching Wang Jun, leaving letters in his taxi, claiming to be his soulmate. This person insists that they and Wang have known each other for a thousand years, and has stories to tell of their various incarnations throughout Chinese history, from the Tang Dynasty to Mao’s regime.

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Book Review

There aren’t many book series that can boast nine novels, a television mini-series, a film and a musical. With the publication of the ninth book in the series, The Days of Anna Madrigal, The Tales of the City series, which began as a newspaper column in 1976, can.

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